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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
24 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
233 X users
facebook
18 Facebook pages
wikipedia
98 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
178 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
330 Mendeley
Title
Genome-wide Evidence Reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals Are Distinct Species
Published in
Current Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2015.06.060
Pubmed ID
Authors

Klaus-Peter Koepfli, John Pollinger, Raquel Godinho, Jacqueline Robinson, Amanda Lea, Sarah Hendricks, Rena M. Schweizer, Olaf Thalmann, Pedro Silva, Zhenxin Fan, Andrey A. Yurchenko, Pavel Dobrynin, Alexey Makunin, James A. Cahill, Beth Shapiro, Francisco Álvares, José C. Brito, Eli Geffen, Jennifer A. Leonard, Kristofer M. Helgen, Warren E. Johnson, Stephen J. O’Brien, Blaire Van Valkenburgh, Robert K. Wayne

Abstract

The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus) [1, 2], which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a previously unrecognized phylogenetically distinct species despite a long history of taxonomic work on African canids. To test the distinct-species hypothesis and understand the evolutionary history that would account for this puzzling result, we analyzed extensive genomic data including mitochondrial genome sequences, sequences from 20 autosomal loci (17 introns and 3 exon segments), microsatellite loci, X- and Y-linked zinc-finger protein gene (ZFX and ZFY) sequences, and whole-genome nuclear sequences in African and Eurasian golden jackals and gray wolves. Our results provide consistent and robust evidence that populations of golden jackals from Africa and Eurasia represent distinct monophyletic lineages separated for more than one million years, sufficient to merit formal recognition as different species: C. anthus (African golden wolf) and C. aureus (Eurasian golden jackal). Using morphologic data, we demonstrate a striking morphologic similarity between East African and Eurasian golden jackals, suggesting parallelism, which may have misled taxonomists and likely reflects uniquely intense interspecific competition in the East African carnivore guild. Our study shows how ecology can confound taxonomy if interspecific competition constrains size diversification.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 233 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 330 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Bulgaria 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 319 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 68 21%
Researcher 64 19%
Student > Master 49 15%
Student > Bachelor 31 9%
Other 24 7%
Other 43 13%
Unknown 51 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 164 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 39 12%
Environmental Science 29 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 2%
Other 23 7%
Unknown 64 19%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 421. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2024.
All research outputs
#68,848
of 25,401,381 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#464
of 14,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#631
of 275,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#8
of 172 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,401,381 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,693 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 61.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,026 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 172 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.