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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
82 X users
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
457 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
657 Mendeley
Title
Biological evidence supports an early and complex emergence of the Isthmus of Panama
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1423853112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine D. Bacon, Daniele Silvestro, Carlos Jaramillo, Brian Tilston Smith, Prosanta Chakrabarty, Alexandre Antonelli

Abstract

The linking of North and South America by the Isthmus of Panama had major impacts on global climate, oceanic and atmospheric currents, and biodiversity, yet the timing of this critical event remains contentious. The Isthmus is traditionally understood to have fully closed by ca. 3.5 million years ago (Ma), and this date has been used as a benchmark for oceanographic, climatic, and evolutionary research, but recent evidence suggests a more complex geological formation. Here, we analyze both molecular and fossil data to evaluate the tempo of biotic exchange across the Americas in light of geological evidence. We demonstrate significant waves of dispersal of terrestrial organisms at approximately ca. 20 and 6 Ma and corresponding events separating marine organisms in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans at ca. 23 and 7 Ma. The direction of dispersal and their rates were symmetrical until the last ca. 6 Ma, when northern migration of South American lineages increased significantly. Variability among taxa in their timing of dispersal or vicariance across the Isthmus is not explained by the ecological factors tested in these analyses, including biome type, dispersal ability, and elevation preference. Migration was therefore not generally regulated by intrinsic traits but more likely reflects the presence of emergent terrain several millions of years earlier than commonly assumed. These results indicate that the dramatic biotic turnover associated with the Great American Biotic Interchange was a long and complex process that began as early as the Oligocene-Miocene transition.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 657 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 2%
Brazil 12 2%
Colombia 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 613 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 122 19%
Researcher 96 15%
Student > Bachelor 95 14%
Student > Master 78 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 53 8%
Other 118 18%
Unknown 95 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 337 51%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 75 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 42 6%
Environmental Science 42 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 <1%
Other 30 5%
Unknown 125 19%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 248. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2023.
All research outputs
#151,927
of 25,837,817 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3,016
of 103,917 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,546
of 281,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#37
of 934 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,837,817 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 103,917 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,759 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 934 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.