↓ Skip to main content
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
26 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
79 X users
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
142 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
188 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Climate constrains the evolutionary history and biodiversity of crocodylians
Published in
Nature Communications, September 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms9438
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip D. Mannion, Roger B. J. Benson, Matthew T. Carrano, Jonathan P. Tennant, Jack Judd, Richard J. Butler

Abstract

The fossil record of crocodylians and their relatives (pseudosuchians) reveals a rich evolutionary history, prompting questions about causes of long-term decline to their present-day low biodiversity. We analyse climatic drivers of subsampled pseudosuchian biodiversity over their 250 million year history, using a comprehensive new data set. Biodiversity and environmental changes correlate strongly, with long-term decline of terrestrial taxa driven by decreasing temperatures in northern temperate regions, and biodiversity decreases at lower latitudes matching patterns of increasing aridification. However, there is no relationship between temperature and biodiversity for marine pseudosuchians, with sea-level change and post-extinction opportunism demonstrated to be more important drivers. A 'modern-type' latitudinal biodiversity gradient might have existed throughout pseudosuchian history, and range expansion towards the poles occurred during warm intervals. Although their fossil record suggests that current global warming might promote long-term increases in crocodylian biodiversity and geographic range, the 'balancing forces' of anthropogenic environmental degradation complicate future predictions.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 79 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
As of 1 July 2024, you may notice a temporary increase in the numbers of X profiles with Unknown location. Click here to learn more.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
United States 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 182 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 24%
Student > Bachelor 36 19%
Researcher 23 12%
Student > Master 20 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 4%
Other 26 14%
Unknown 30 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 56 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 6%
Environmental Science 10 5%
Chemical Engineering 1 <1%
Other 7 4%
Unknown 36 19%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 282. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2023.
All research outputs
#132,957
of 26,383,000 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#1,928
of 61,001 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,542
of 287,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#23
of 755 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,383,000 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 61,001 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,063 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 755 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.