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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
72 X users
facebook
11 Facebook pages
wikipedia
9 Wikipedia pages
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
Title
Stretchy nerves are an essential component of the extreme feeding mechanism of rorqual whales
Published in
Current Biology, May 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2015.03.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Wayne Vogl, Margo A. Lillie, Marina A. Piscitelli, Jeremy A. Goldbogen, Nicholas D. Pyenson, Robert E. Shadwick

Abstract

Rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) are among the largest vertebrates that have ever lived and include blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (Balaenoptera physalus) whales. Rorquals differ from other baleen whales (Mysticeti) in possessing longitudinal furrows or grooves in the ventral skin that extend from the mouth to the umbilicus. This ventral grooved blubber directly relates to their intermittent lunge feeding strategy, which is unique among vertebrates and was potentially an evolutionary innovation that led to gigantism in this lineage [1]. This strategy involves the rorqual whale rapidly engulfing a huge volume of prey-laden water and then concentrating the prey by more slowly expelling the water through baleen plates (Figure 1A). The volume of water engulfed during a lunge can exceed the volume of the whale itself [2]. During engulfment, the whale accelerates, opens its jaw until it is almost perpendicular to the rostrum, and then the highly compliant floor of the oral cavity is inflated by the incoming water [3]. The floor of the oral cavity expands by inversion of the tongue and ballooning of the adjacent floor of the mouth into the cavum ventrale, an immense fascial pocket between the body wall and overlying blubber layer that reaches as far back as the umbilicus. The ventral grooved blubber in fin whales expands by an estimated 162% in the circumferential direction and 38% longitudinally [4]. In fin whales, multiple lunges can occur during a single dive, and the average time between lunges is just over forty seconds [3]. Here, we show that nerves in the floor of the oral cavity of fin whales are highly extensible.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 2 3%
Iceland 1 1%
Unknown 67 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 24%
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Master 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Professor 4 6%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 49%
Environmental Science 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 13 19%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 265. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2022.
All research outputs
#141,006
of 25,913,612 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#764
of 14,867 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,406
of 280,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#18
of 186 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,913,612 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,867 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 62.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,132 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 186 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.